Energy and force relationship

NGSS - PS3C - Relationship Between Energy and Forces — bozemanscience

energy and force relationship

In physics, a force is said to do work if, when acting, there is a displacement of the point of the ball (a force) multiplied by the distance to the ground (a displacement). Work transfers energy from one place to another, or one form to another. The integral form of this relationship is F in the definition of potential energy is the force exerted by the force field, e.g., gravity, spring force, etc. The potential. Energy gives us one more tool to use to analyze physical situations. This linear relationship between the force and the displacement is.

Potential Energy

Power Power is defined as the rate at which work is done upon an object. Like all rate quantities, power is a time-based quantity.

Power is related to how fast a job is done. Two identical jobs or tasks can be done at different rates - one slowly or and one rapidly. The work is the same in each case since they are identical jobs but the power is different. The equation for power shows the importance of time: Special attention should be taken so as not to confuse the unit Watt, abbreviated W, with the quantity work, also abbreviated by the letter W.

Combining the equations for power and work can lead to a second equation for power.

energy and force relationship

A few of the problems in this set of problems will utilize this derived equation for power. Mechanical, Kinetic and Potential Energies There are two forms of mechanical energy - potential energy and kinetic energy. Potential energy is the stored energy of position. In this set of problems, we will be most concerned with the stored energy due to the vertical position of an object within Earth's gravitational field.

Kinetic energy is defined as the energy possessed by an object due to its motion. An object must be moving to possess kinetic energy.

energy and force relationship

The amount of kinetic energy KE possessed by a moving object is dependent upon mass and speed. The total mechanical energy possessed by an object is the sum of its kinetic and potential energies. Work-Energy Connection There is a relationship between work and total mechanical energy.

Relationship between mass, energy, and a force? - Physics Stack Exchange

The final amount of total mechanical energy TMEf possessed by the system is equivalent to the initial amount of energy TMEi plus the work done by these non-conservative forces Wnc.

The mechanical energy possessed by a system is the sum of the kinetic energy and the potential energy.

energy and force relationship

Positive work is done on a system when the force doing the work acts in the direction of the motion of the object. Negative work is done when the force doing the work opposes the motion of the object.

energy and force relationship

When a positive value for work is substituted into the work-energy equation above, the final amount of energy will be greater than the initial amount of energy; the system is said to have gained mechanical energy. When a negative value for work is substituted into the work-energy equation above, the final amount of energy will be less than the initial amount of energy; the system is said to have lost mechanical energy.

There are occasions in which the only forces doing work are conservative forces sometimes referred to as internal forces.

Typically, such conservative forces include gravitational forces, elastic or spring forces, electrical forces and magnetic forces. When the only forces doing work are conservative forces, then the Wnc term in the equation above is zero.

NGSS - PS3C - Relationship Between Energy and Forces

In such instances, the system is said to have conserved its mechanical energy. The work-energy principle There is a strong connection between work and energy, in a sense that when there is a net force doing work on an object, the object's kinetic energy will change by an amount equal to the work done: Note that the work in this equation is the work done by the net force, rather than the work done by an individual force.

Gravitational potential energy Let's say you're dropping a ball from a certain height, and you'd like to know how fast it's traveling the instant it hits the ground. You could apply the projectile motion equations, or you could think of the situation in terms of energy actually, one of the projectile motion equations is really an energy equation in disguise.

If you drop an object it falls down, picking up speed along the way. This means there must be a net force on the object, doing work.

Potential energy - Wikipedia

This force is the force of gravity, with a magnitude equal to mg, the weight of the object. The work done by the force of gravity is the force multiplied by the distance, so if the object drops a distance h, gravity does work on the object equal to the force multiplied by the height lost, which is: An object with potential energy has the potential to do work.

In the case of gravitational potential energy, the object has the potential to do work because of where it is, at a certain height above the ground, or at least above something.

Spring potential energy Energy can also be stored in a stretched or compressed spring. An ideal spring is one in which the amount the spring stretches or compresses is proportional to the applied force. This linear relationship between the force and the displacement is known as Hooke's law.

For a spring this can be written: The larger k is, the stiffer the spring is and the harder the spring is to stretch. If an object applies a force to a spring, the spring applies an equal and opposite force to the object. This is a restoring force, because when the spring is stretched, the force exerted by by the spring is opposite to the direction it is stretched.

energy and force relationship

This accounts for the oscillating motion of a mass on a spring. If a mass hanging down from a spring is pulled down and let go, the spring exerts an upward force on the mass, moving it back to the equilibrium position, and then beyond.

This compresses the spring, so the spring exerts a downward force on the mass, stopping it, and then moving it back to the equilibrium and beyond, at which point the cycle repeats. This kind of motion is known as simple harmonic motion, which we'll come back to later in the course. The potential energy stored in a spring is given by: In a perfect spring, no energy is lost; the energy is simply transferred back and forth between the kinetic energy of the mass on the spring and the potential energy of the spring gravitational PE might be involved, too.