My relationship with you is all the world to me james moore

my relationship with you is all the world to me james moore

How a Few Church Rejects Changed the World James Moore Even the belief that God had forsaken me was fostered by my own In the dream I asked God, “ what are you going to do with that? Since then, my relationship with God has been more personal and precious than if he had made my own dreams come true. Tracklist with lyrics of the album VERY BEST OF JAMES MOORE [] from Rev . James Moore: Bread of Heaven - He Was There All the Time - Joy - My 04, My Relationship, Pt. 1. 05, It Ain't Over. 06, Blessed Albums you may also like. Thoughts on Faith and Grace from a Master Storyteller James W. Moore to keephis special brand of kindness alive and well in the world through me, She said, "You'regoingto laugh when I tell youthis, but I know my husband loves me you can know that a lot of that kind of sacrifice is going on in that relationship.

Now at the time I was still perhaps a year away from commencing From Helland after I'd completed an episode or two [of Big Numbers] Neil Gaiman sent me a copy of Iain's extraordinary book Lud Heat which catalysed something within me.

I was already becoming preoccupied with landscape, particularly the landscape I was living in, but the way that Iain had approached the concept in Lud Heat and his subsequent work was extraordinary. It brought a focus to it which I don't know, and probably never will know whether I could have achieved on my own.

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There was an electricity with which he was engaging with the most microscopic level of meaning inherent in any place on any street corner. When Big Numbers fell by the wayside after a couple of issues and I went into From Hell, certainly the concept of London as a web of signs and signals became a really useful tool, in order to examine this series of quasi-historical, quasi-mythical series of events around the Whitechapel killings.

I was in contact with Iain from quite early on and I think we've approached the territory differently; certainly while I was doing From Hell I was starting to feel that yes, this is a type of geographical reading of London, but I tend to think of London as Iain's territory, or at least as the territory of the London writers.

I've got no problems with encroaching upon that territory just as Iain came up and visited Northampton, when he was writing Edge of The Orison, but I felt that I should perhaps pay attention to my own town before exploring other places, which was what led to Voice Of The Fire.

They really did, and it wasn't just psychogeography — it was the remarkable quality of Iain's writing that blew me away as much as the concepts that he was utilising; it was his approach to language itself; this incredible intellectual density, which I think a lot of people find off-putting at first, but the richness, which Iain can bring to a crack in the pavement.

I find it overwhelming, exhausting and I have to put it down every few pages. That's no bad way to read it, it will take you a long time, but as James Joyce remarked about Finnegans Wake: It was more the fact that after reading Iain's work I felt that I had to man up, I had to shift things up a gear, because knowing that prose of that quality was possible, unless you tried to address that, any other response is like, cowardice, or defeat, surrender It was like when I read Burroughs as a teenager.

It made me realise that prose was capable of doing certain other things than things that I had previously attributed to it.

my relationship with you is all the world to me james moore

Later on I found that Iain's kind of literary genealogy is not a million miles away from my own, its just that his has got a much finer eye attached to it and a much greater body of knowledge, but I think we were both inspired by the energy of the Beat writers and the culture that spread out from them. So there were points of contact, but the sheer level of attack that Iain puts into his writing Did it also make you want to do for Northampton what he'd done for Hackney?

Like I say, I'd already got that in my mind before discovering Iain's work; it was probably that I was groping towards what my readings of Iain's work would illuminate for me. He gave me a much sharper focus upon what it was that I was actually doing. And yes I certainly wanted to bring that level of attention to Northampton, that was true of Voice Of The Fire, and of Jerusalem, though Jerusalem is the first thing that I've written for a long time where I feel that I have managed to move out from under Iain's influence at least quite so evidently, in my own work.

This is where I am now in my life; making a conscious effort to attempt a new voice; but yeah, again, its a work that is not just focused on Northampton but on the half a square mile of Northampton in which I grew up, and is approaching half a million words, and I can imagine that my next book will be a million words and focused entirely on one paving slab That's something that I explicitly wanted to ask you about, because in 'The Dance Of The Gull Catchers', in the appendix to From Hell, you invoke Koch's Snowflake, where a finite space can contain a shape of infinite length but can never exceed that space, and in the context of Ripperology those infinitely fine details will become increasingly irrelevant Because the original area that the case covers can never be exceeded.

Right - because that's an area of time — the autumn of But in some ways what Iain does with Hackney and what you do with that 'ten-mile hot-zone' in Voice Of The Fire is you've flipped it on its head, and made that space which you never exceed a physical rather than temporal space, so that Koch's Snowflake becomes a positive rather than a negative thing.

I think that there's something to be said for that, although I probably hadn't thought of it in those terms until you said the words, but yeah, that makes sense, it's kind of an inversion. What was a limitation in the case of From Hell — the autumn of — does become liberating when you make it geographical rather than temporal space.

I think that Iain's ideas have certainly evolved over the years, but my ideas upon the subject have fluctuated; I don't know whether I'll come to any conclusions or whether coming to conclusions is necessarily a good thing, but I remember that when I was starting my series of irregular magickal performances with the Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre Of Marvels, when me and Tim Perkins and sometimes Dave Jay [aka David J] were doing site specific performances most of which were around London, where I was kind of charged by a great enthusiasm for the subject, for psychogeography, my theory then was that there was no single street corner, no single stretch of pavement, corner of a field, anywhere, throughout the world, where if studied thoroughly enough would not yield an incredible amount of information and legend and history.

He found Northampton on the other hand a really vibrant and powerful place in terms of the stories embedded in it. He may have a point, he's been doing this longer than I have, I tend to trust his instincts. It may be that not every place is as charged as every other place. I would still prefer to believe that. When we were doing those early psychogeographic performances there was the one that we had agreed to do at Highbury, at the Garage, this had sprung out of when I'd had Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty use my house as one of the official venues of The KLF Burn A Million Quid.

And I met a guy called Chris Brook and he was running a club night up at the Garage and I thought we'd do one of our site-specific things about Highbury, and when I did my first appraisal of the site I feared that just as Iain had said, that not everywhere had the same energy or charge. Initially I was looking for famous murders, ghosts, stuff like that, and couldn't find anything, but once I stopped looking for the things that I expected to find there and started looking at what was actually there I found all of these incredible things.

Now again this isn't to say that Iain isn't absolutely right, that there are dead spots throughout the landscape that no amount of insight can bring to light. I prefer to live in hope; when I do find a place that can give up nothing then I'll concur with Iain. One thing that strikes me when I compare your work with Iain's work is the singularity of the medium. You've gone out of your way to argue for the autonomy and singularity of comic books, and we live in an age where things are valued in terms of their potential for film and TV adaptation, and you've gone out of your way to make things that are unfilmable, and while I'm not completely sure that this is the case, I've felt that Iain's work couldn't be translated to anything outside of the English language.

my relationship with you is all the world to me james moore

I really don't know, there may be French translations of his work, I would hope there would be I tried but I couldn't find any information online about translations. But on the other hand I find it difficult to imagine. She had received several injuries to his one scratch. Then again, he had only killed one man.

The Man with the Golden Gun (film) - Wikiquote

Who knew exactly how many she was responsible for? Merros felt a deep chill creep through him. There is always a risk of infection. Madness, it had to be. So a bunch of other stuff goes down and - wait- I forgot to mention the Sa'ba Taalor can heal themselves with metal.

my relationship with you is all the world to me james moore

I don't know the whole story behind that yet but it is cool as hell! So the bunch of other stuff goes down and then the Sa'ba Taalor decide they are going home. Merros sees his new friends off and thinks he's going to have a normal day.

Some woman creeps out and kills the Emperor and pushes him out the window. Then some sshat that's over the whole army thing whatever sends soldiers after the Sa'ba Taalor. Dude, what part of your dumb as hell don't you understand? Merros finds out and freaks clean out and pretty much tells him he's an idiot and he watched them leave way before the Emperor was killed. And of course nothing goes well for the soldiers that went and attacked them.

Did it also make you want to do for Northampton what he'd done for Hackney? Like I say, I'd already got that in my mind before discovering Iain's work; it was probably that I was groping towards what my readings of Iain's work would illuminate for me.

He gave me a much sharper focus upon what it was that I was actually doing. And yes I certainly wanted to bring that level of attention to Northampton, that was true of Voice Of The Fire, and of Jerusalem, though Jerusalem is the first thing that I've written for a long time where I feel that I have managed to move out from under Iain's influence at least quite so evidently, in my own work.

This is where I am now in my life; making a conscious effort to attempt a new voice; but yeah, again, its a work that is not just focused on Northampton but on the half a square mile of Northampton in which I grew up, and is approaching half a million words, and I can imagine that my next book will be a million words and focused entirely on one paving slab That's something that I explicitly wanted to ask you about, because in 'The Dance Of The Gull Catchers', in the appendix to From Hell, you invoke Koch's Snowflake, where a finite space can contain a shape of infinite length but can never exceed that space, and in the context of Ripperology those infinitely fine details will become increasingly irrelevant Because the original area that the case covers can never be exceeded.

Right - because that's an area of time — the autumn of But in some ways what Iain does with Hackney and what you do with that 'ten-mile hot-zone' in Voice Of The Fire is you've flipped it on its head, and made that space which you never exceed a physical rather than temporal space, so that Koch's Snowflake becomes a positive rather than a negative thing. I think that there's something to be said for that, although I probably hadn't thought of it in those terms until you said the words, but yeah, that makes sense, it's kind of an inversion.

What was a limitation in the case of From Hell — the autumn of — does become liberating when you make it geographical rather than temporal space. I think that Iain's ideas have certainly evolved over the years, but my ideas upon the subject have fluctuated; I don't know whether I'll come to any conclusions or whether coming to conclusions is necessarily a good thing, but I remember that when I was starting my series of irregular magickal performances with the Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre Of Marvels, when me and Tim Perkins and sometimes Dave Jay [aka David J] were doing site specific performances most of which were around London, where I was kind of charged by a great enthusiasm for the subject, for psychogeography, my theory then was that there was no single street corner, no single stretch of pavement, corner of a field, anywhere, throughout the world, where if studied thoroughly enough would not yield an incredible amount of information and legend and history.

He found Northampton on the other hand a really vibrant and powerful place in terms of the stories embedded in it. He may have a point, he's been doing this longer than I have, I tend to trust his instincts.

It may be that not every place is as charged as every other place.

my relationship with you is all the world to me james moore

I would still prefer to believe that. When we were doing those early psychogeographic performances there was the one that we had agreed to do at Highbury, at the Garage, this had sprung out of when I'd had Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty use my house as one of the official venues of The KLF Burn A Million Quid.

And I met a guy called Chris Brook and he was running a club night up at the Garage and I thought we'd do one of our site-specific things about Highbury, and when I did my first appraisal of the site I feared that just as Iain had said, that not everywhere had the same energy or charge.

Seven Forges (Seven Forges, #1) by James A. Moore

Initially I was looking for famous murders, ghosts, stuff like that, and couldn't find anything, but once I stopped looking for the things that I expected to find there and started looking at what was actually there I found all of these incredible things. Now again this isn't to say that Iain isn't absolutely right, that there are dead spots throughout the landscape that no amount of insight can bring to light.

I prefer to live in hope; when I do find a place that can give up nothing then I'll concur with Iain. One thing that strikes me when I compare your work with Iain's work is the singularity of the medium. You've gone out of your way to argue for the autonomy and singularity of comic books, and we live in an age where things are valued in terms of their potential for film and TV adaptation, and you've gone out of your way to make things that are unfilmable, and while I'm not completely sure that this is the case, I've felt that Iain's work couldn't be translated to anything outside of the English language.

I really don't know, there may be French translations of his work, I would hope there would be I tried but I couldn't find any information online about translations. But on the other hand I find it difficult to imagine. It is very English-specific, it uses the full richness of the English language, and I don't want to sound Nationalistic here but it is an unusually good language, mainly because we've been invaded by so may people with interesting proper languages, and what we've got isn't a language in the normal sense, it doesn't have any of those accepted formal parts that proper languages have, its more a kind of slave patois, but Iain uses that like an orchestra.

Almost dissociative, verb-less sentences, one-word sentences A lot of that is Iain's origins as a poet before he wrote prose; looking at something like Lud Heat, it's kind of a poem that has overrun it's own structure, it's bordering on prose. Yes, that's it, that's the kind of hinterland that has emerged from his poetry; you could argue that all his books are extended poems. There is the way that he treats the sentence, the word, that is right down there in the molecules of the language in the way that a poet has to be.

That's my theory anyway. There's an interesting back and forth in the way that you've influenced each other; I wanted to ask you more about this, because I first came across Sinclair in your endnotes to From Hell where you mention Lud Heat where he first proposes the pentagrammatic link between Hawksmoor's churches and Cleopatra's Needle, and this forms the route of the coach ride that Gull and Netley take across the capital in From Hell even taking in Sinclair's own Albion Drive address on the way.

I then got hold of Lights Out For The Territory and was delighted to find that he refers to that coach ride in that book. I wondered if you then batted it back to him at some point — did I miss a beat?

Seven Forges

Well it's a funny kind of relationship, it has gone back and forth but I must say that influence has been much more on my part than on Iain's, though I have noticed that I have become one of his menagerie of unusual characters that turn up fairly frequently in his work. There's a lot of interesting feedback, and its nice being part of Iain's Todd Browning kind of collection. You get to spend a couple of hours pedalling down a river in Tonbridge Wells in a giant plastic swan with Stewart Lee.

It's not a bad way to spend your retirement. When you were saying about how Iain found certain areas to be psychogeographically 'dead' I thought that was interesting because with London Orbital that was quite a Ballardian thing for him, exploring areas outside his normal stamping ground.

Well perhaps that's him challenging his own hypothesis because the M25, a road leading nowhere was supposed to be entirely dead and he explored it by circumnavigating it and I thought that was one of his most extraordinary pieces, though he has got a fairly good track record of extraordinary pieces.

my relationship with you is all the world to me james moore

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